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Energy Management can be a tricky topic to approach depending on your industry. There are a lot of factors that need to be considered to ensure that you are accurately monitoring and measuring your energy consumption.

Thankfully ISO 50001, the Standard for Energy Management, does provide a lot of useful guidance to help you get started. As a reminder, ISO 50001 can help your business to continually improve its energy performance, energy efficiency, energy use and energy consumption. Building an energy management system (EMS) based on the requirements of ISO 50001 will ultimately help you to understand, monitor and measure your use of energy.

However, even with the guidance, we often see a few common mistakes companies make while managing their EMS. Today Darren Morrow, Senior Isologist here at Blackmores, joins us to share his top 5 mistakes to avoid while managing an EMS.

You’ll learn

  • What is ISO 50001?
  • 5 mistakes to avoid while managing an Energy Management System
  • How can you avoid these mistakes?  

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[00:30] What is ISO 50001? ISO 50001 is all about continually improving energy performance, energy efficiency, energy use and energy consumption. By Implementing an energy management system, you will be able to fully understand and monitor and measure your use of energy. Like most other ISO’s, continual improvement is at the heart of ISO 50001, and It’s also based on the Annex SL format. So, it shares some similarities with Standards such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. If you’ve got ISO 14001, you’re already half-way there!

[01:14] We have a more detailed walkthrough of ISO 50001 Implementation available in our steps to success podcast series, which are episodes: 84, 85 and 88

[02:00] Mistake 1 – Lack of commitment from top management: This can be one of the biggest issues and can cause the most damage in relation to any management system.

A lack of support from top management often leads to:-

  • A loss of motivation for improvement
  • A lack of financial support and resources – The EMS should be considered in budgets so you can account for any additional maintenance that needs to be done to ensure equipment is running optimally, or possibly investing in newer technology that is designed to be more efficient.
  • Lack of alignment of the EMS and organisational goals and objectives – Everyone in the business should be aware of the organisation’s goals, if energy management is included as part of those goals, then they are more likely to be fulfilled.

Having a commitment from top management ensures that EMS is part of the business and not just a bolt on.  

[03:25] Mistake 2 – Built by one person or department: If one person is deemed ultimately responsible, even if supported by top management, overall commitment throughout the business can be difficult, sometimes with comments such as ‘that’s Bob’s job’.

With one person or department, there can be the lack of authority to make decisions, and inevitably they can become siloed from the rest of the business – not hearing about improvement opportunities, not being involved in internal projects, etc.

Ensure that, even in a smaller businesses where one person may form the ‘Energy Team’,  that everyone is able to contribute.

[04:20] Mistake 3 – Rushed Implementation of the Energy Management System: This can lead to confusion as to who is responsible and what responsibilities are shared. It can also lead to failures to record opportunities for improvement, or for monitoring and managing any deviations in energy consumption that may occur and require investigation.

There is also the risk of a lack of awareness amongst staff if you’ve not taken the time to communicate roles and responsibilities in relation to the EMS.

[05:30] Mistake 4 – Manual controls that can be overridden by staff:  A lot of what you monitor and measure may be automated, but there will always be elements where there is a potential for human error. So ideally, where possible during energy reviews or audits, consider those elements that humans have direct impact for the control and influence of energy.

Typical examples include:

  • Heating and cooling – Problems and excessive energy use can be caused through individuals changing temperatures resulting in equipment working harder and on many occasions working against each other.
  • Lighting – Many companies now have sensor controlled lighting, this ensures lights are only switched on when required. Manual lighting controls typically have resulted in lights being switched on and left on in rooms that are not occupied, example being meeting rooms.

[06:50] Mistake 5 – Data collection and monitoring: Data collection is crucial in supporting decision making and also to be able to demonstrate improvement. Common pitfalls in this category include:

  • Lack of attention to monitoring and measurement results / trends – there is a likelihood that data will not be collected properly, recorded incorrectly, resulting in data that is only used to populate a spreadsheet or software based database, and does not provide any valuable information.

Results may not be analyzed at appropriate times to identify any trends or issues / deviations that may arise, potentially leading to inefficiencies in equipment operations, and ultimately increased costs

  • Poor data collection and record keeping and general housekeeping – Data if not collected periodically, covering determined periods, will result in being unable to compare consumption on a like-for-like basis. This means you will only be recording usage, with significantly reduced means to identify opportunities for improvement and / or causes for deviations.
  • Relying on energy bills (estimated and not reading meters) – This should be a last resort for data collection. This will not provide accurate information to base decisions on, inevitably bills will show an estimated consumption and cost, followed by a ‘reading’ sometime during the year, resulting in an amendment or adjustment being made – primarily cost.

This has a significant impact the data collected, along with any possibility of accurately identifying improvements and / or deviations that could impact the business

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We’re already seeing the devastating effects of failing to maintain global warming at the 1.5 degrees, as pledged in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. In order to get this back on track we all need to consider our current energy consumption.

So, what can businesses do to manage their impact?

That’s where ISO 50001, the Standard for Energy Management, comes in! ISO 50001 can help your business to continually improve its energy performance, energy efficiency, energy use and energy consumption. Building an energy management system will ultimately help you to understand, monitor and measure your use of energy.

Today Darren Morrow, Senior Isologist here at Blackmores, joins us to share his top 5 top tips for ISO 50001 Implementation.

You’ll learn

  • What is ISO 50001?
  • 5 top tips for Implementing and Energy Management System

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[00:52] We have a more detailed walkthrough of ISO 50001 Implementation available in our steps to success podcast series, which are episodes: 84, 85 and 88

[01:05] What is ISO 50001? ISO 50001 is all about continually improving energy performance, energy efficiency, energy use and energy consumption. By Implementing an energy management system, you will be able to fully understand and monitor and measure your use of energy. Like most other ISO’s, continual improvement is at the heart of ISO 50001, and It’s also based on the Annex SL format. So, it shares some similarities with Standards such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. If you’ve got ISO 14001, you’re already half-way there!

[01:40] ISO 50001 and ESOS – ISO 50001 can also help you comply with ESOS (The Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme). If you’d like to learn more about that, listen to episode 138.

[02:50] Tip 1 – Top Management commitment and allocation of resources: This is vital, as the reason for implementation, management, requirements and aims along with expectations of everyone within the business for their support, is clearly demonstrated and communicated from the top down.

With an energy management system, part of this commitment includes making sure suitable resources are made available, this includes:

  • People – For implementation, maintenance and improvement of the systems, including the means of gathering and reporting data.
  • Financial support – There will be times where investment will be required. Ensuring existing equipment maintenance and servicing undertaken as required to maintain efficiency.

Allocate clear responsibilities for individuals e.g. gathering data such as meter readings, fuel usage, so that this is done consistently and the data is not only available but accurate.

[04:14] Tip 2 – Data: For data collection we need to understand certain things, an Energy review will support the identification of energy sources, identify and understand energy use and determine clear performance monitoring and indicators, leading to the determination of the data required. Some key considerations include:

  • Identify sources of energy and your energy consumption from the energy review
  • The quality, precision and accuracy of the data collected needs to be considered and monitored if measuring / monitoring results are to be meaningful.
  • Data collection frequency should be determined and maintained to support the overall statistical analysis.

Finally, set goals and targets for improvement (EnPIs) – this can be in overall energy consumption, specific equipment improvements, other ratios measures such as consumption per person of consumption vs revenue.

[06:10] Tip 3 – Align and Integrate with other business management systems, goals and strategies: Sounds simple, but not always undertaken effectively, when implementing an energy management system consider any other management system that is already in place and look at any similarities, any elements that already exist that can be tweaked or expanded – this way, it is treated as ‘business as usual’.

[07:20] Tip 4 – Communication, training and awareness:  Communication plays a key role in any system, make sure you:

  • Communicate requirements, goals and commitments, and objectives or targets.
  • Keep staff informed of what’s going on as their involvement and direct actions support achieving goals and targets, along with identifying improvements.
  • Assign responsibilities, create a team and/or assign a champion – This supports the effectiveness of data collection, and also can increase motivation and encourage identification of energy saving opportunities

Energy savings require the commitment of the whole workforce. There ideally needs to be a champion in the organization who can drive change and savings.

[08:41] Tip 5 – Record opportunities for improving energy efficiency: Any and all identified opportunities can be, and should be logged and monitored for suitability, no matter how ‘far out there’ these may be.

Some may not be appropriate or feasible immediately, or in the short term, possibly due to costs / investment requirements. However, once an opportunity is logged, it can be monitored, assigned financial support and be planned for Implementation.

[10:40] We’re offering a Buy 1 Get 1 Free offer on isologyhub memberships until the 31st October 2023! Contact us to book a demo

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How do I establish Energy Performance Indicators and Energy Baselines?

Energy performance indicators or EnPIs are defined as a measure or unit of energy performance as defined by the organisation. This can be expressed by using a simple metric, ratio, or a model, depending on the nature of the activities being measured.

Examples of Energy Performance Indicators

Examples of EnPI’s can include:

  • kWh consumed per site
  • kWh per linear metre of product produced
  • kWh per number of staff
  • kWh per square meter of occupied office space

It is critically important to determine a suitable range of relevant EnPI’s based on the results of the energy review. EnPI’s should help to demonstrate continual improvement in either efficiency, use and/or consumption.

Energy Baselines

An energy baseline (EnB) is defined as a quantitative reference(s) providing a basis for comparison of energy performance.

An energy baseline is based on data from a specified period of time and/or conditions, as defined by the organisation.

An example of an EnB:

kWh consumed in the 2015 period. Thus, energy efficiency, use and consumption can be compared against this baseline data to determine if an improvement has been achieved.

Energy baseline(s) are used for determination of energy performance improvement, as a reference before and after, or with and without implementation of energy performance improvement actions.

It is a requirement of the standard that monitoring and measurement activities should include comparison of data against the stated baseline(s)

ISO 50015 provides additional information on measurement and verification of energy performance.

ISO 50006 provides additional information on EnPI(s) and EnBs.

Need assistance with ISO 50001? At Blackmores, we are ISO consultants and we work with clients in all industries to help them gain their ISO standards. We’d be happy to help you, simply contact us at: enquiries@blackmoresuk.com

ISO 50001 energy review banner

What is an Energy Review?

An energy review is a documented analysis of energy efficiency, energy use, and energy consumption based on data and other information, leading to the identification of areas of significant energy use (SEU) and opportunities for energy performance improvement.

The energy review will help to establish energy performance indicators (EnPI’s), energy baselines and objectives and targets for improvement.

What Should an Energy Review Include?

The energy review should include:

  1. a) Analysis of energy use and consumption based on measurements and other data i.e.

⎯ Identify current energy sources;

⎯ Evaluate past and present energy use and consumption;

  1. b) Identification of the areas of significant energy use, i.e.

⎯ Identify the facilities, equipment, systems, processes and personnel working for, or on behalf of, the organization that significantly affect energy use and consumption;

⎯ Identify other relevant variables affecting significant energy uses;

⎯ Determine the current energy performance of facilities, equipment, systems and processes related to identified significant energy uses;

⎯ Estimate future energy use and consumption;

  1. c) Identify, prioritize and record opportunities for improving energy performance.

Opportunities can relate to potential sources of energy, the use of renewable energy, or other alternative energy sources, such as waste energy.

The energy review should be updated at defined intervals (you define what this is), as well as in response to major changes in any facilities, equipment, systems, or processes.

ISO 50001 with Blackmores ISO Consultancy

Are you looking for an ISO consultant to work with your business? We work with organisations in various industries to help them put systems in place to gain their certifications. If you need assistance with ISO 50001 we’d be happy to help, contact us at: enquiries@blackmoresuk.com 

ISO50001 requires us to undertake activities to check the effectiveness of the EnMS. In this blog we will focus on ISO 50001 clause 9 – Performance Evaluation, and in particular clause 9.1 which relates to Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation of energy performance and the EnMS. Along with internal audit (9.2) and management review (9.3) clause 9.1 makes up a significant part of the “checking” activities required to confirm the EnMS remains suitable, adequate and effective.

ISO 50001 Clause 9 – Performance Evaluation

ISO 50001 clause 9 – performance evaluation is split into several parts.

Clause 9.1 is broken down in to two parts and is quite prescriptive, this is for good reason; we need to ensure we are measuring the right things. The outputs of our energy review process (6.3) our objectives targets and action plans (6.2) and our energy data collection plan (6.6) provide us with the main inputs into the process.

So, let’s break down the clause, starting with 9.1.1.

As a starting point we can to identify what needs to be monitored and measured, including at a minimum the following key characteristics:

  • The effectiveness of the action plans in achieving objectives and energy targets;
  • Energy performance Indicators (EnPI(s));
  • Operation of significant energy uses (SEUs);
  • Actual versus expected energy consumption;

Once this has been established, we can define the methods for monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation, to ensure we get valid repeatable and reliable results;

This leads us nicely into stating when monitoring and measurement shall be performed and when the results from monitoring and measurement will be analysed and evaluated.

The final step is to evaluate data created from the implementation of the energy data collection plan with a view to drawing conclusion on energy performance and the effectiveness of the EnMS (see 6.6).

Most importantly and critical to ensuring the ability to demonstrate continual improvement is the need to confirm that improvement in energy performance has been evaluated by comparing energy performance indicator (EnPI) value(s) (see 6.4) against the corresponding baselines (EnB’s) (see 6.5).

Any significant deviations in energy performance should be identified and investigated. An enhanced requirement in ISO50001:2018 requires the organisation to retain documented information on the results of the investigation and response (see 7.5).

Finally, all this needs to be recorded, either electronically or in hard copy to demonstrate evidence that the process is being undertaken effectively. This becomes vital evidence at internal and external audits and provides information for management review (see 9.3.2 [c] 2 and 9.3.3)

The second part of 9.1 requires us to undertake an evaluation of compliance with legal requirements and other requirements at planned intervals.

Clause 9.1.2 requires us to revisit those legal and other requirements identified during the identification of needs and expectations of interested parties (4.2) and gather the necessary evidence to confirm to our own satisfaction that compliance is being maintained. This exercise is sometimes undertaken as part of the internal audit process. Again, documented information (see 7.5) on the results of the evaluation of compliance and any actions taken need to be retained and the results of this exercise inform management review inputs (see 9.3.2 [c] 4)

ISO 50001 Energy Management – Clause 6, Planning & The Energy Review Process

The requirement for energy review is one of the key clauses of the ISO50001 energy management system standard. But why do we need to do this and how do we go about it.?

Undertaking an energy review helps us to understand what energy types we are using, which of these are significant, relevant variables that might affect energy use and allows us to consider and prioritise the opportunities that when implemented can help support the achievement of energy objectives.

Conducting an energy review is a process, the requirements are broken down into energy review inputs, the energy review itself and energy review outputs.

Inputs

The first step of the process is to identify your energy types. These might be use of electricity, use of natural gas, use of fuel in your vehicle fleet. You might obtain a certain percentage of energy from renewable sources, these should also be considered at this stage.

Once you have identified your energy types you will need to gather some consumption data to determine past consumption. How far back should you go…? Ideally you will have a couple of years of reliable data for each energy type if possible, however 12 months of historical data will help to get you started.

The next step is to understand the facilities, equipment, systems or energy-using processes where this energy is being used. This will help to breakdown the data so you can see where the areas of opportunity for improvement may lie.

Energy Review

Now you have the data you can analyse it to determine consumption trends.

Once we can see the trends we can start to consider those variables that may influence energy use, efficiency and consumption. This may include variables such as external temperature change, shift patterns, production volumes, occupancy rates and the expansion of facilities.

We must also consider those personnel can have an impact on energy use. This might include management, maintenance staff, operatives or team leaders whose decisions may impact consumption.

We can then define significant energy uses (SEU’s) The standard defined these as “energy use accounting for substantial energy consumption and/or offering considerable potential for energy performance improvement.” Noting that significance is defined by the organisation and can include facilities, systems, processes, or equipment.

Once we have defined those energy uses that are deemed “significant” we can start to consider and prioritise the opportunities for improvement. Activities should be undertaken to determine the benefit from implementing the opportunity. This may relate to payback (ROI), a saving in consumption (kWh) or cost saving (£ per annum) and will lead to the prioritisation of opportunities and a reasonable assessment of expected kWh savings expected for each opportunity.

Outputs

We can now finally draw our conclusions and present these in the energy review. The requirement to maintain documented information on energy review normally leads to a report being produced. This should include conclusions on energy use and consumption trends, an estimate of future energy use, recommendations for improvement and identified significant energy uses.

In addition to this you need to define energy performance indicators, energy baselines and energy objectives, targets and action plans. Defining EnPI’s and EnB’s correctly is critical to ensuring you can accurately measure and demonstrate improvements in either consumption and/or efficiency.

Once you know which of the selected opportunities you will be implementing, the identified kWh saving expected will inform the targets and action plans, while the identification of significant energy uses will inform the objectives. All of these need to be documented, noting consideration and inclusion of those actions to address risks and opportunities identified (See clauses 4.1, 4.2, 6.1)

Finally, you now know what you want to achieve (objectives, targets and action plans) and you can create an energy data collection plan. This should include measuring those relevant variables for SEUs, energy consumption related to SEUs and to the organisation, operational criteria related to SEUs, static factors (e.g. Facility size; design of installed equipment; number of weekly shifts; range of products) and the data specified in action plans.

This should lead to the creation of a clear measurement plan showing information such as the energy type, specific meters references, frequency of measurement and the responsibility for undertaking measurement activities.

Ensuring that the energy review process is robust and regularly reviewed will provide the basis for an effective EnMS and with top management support (5.1) and the necessary resources (7.1) can drive continual improvement in energy performance for many years to come.
 

What’s the difference between the ISO 2011 and 2018 versions of ISO 50001?

ISO 50001:2018 is based on Annex SL – the new ISO high level structure (HLS) that brings a common framework to all management systems, i.e. it applies a common language across all standards.

This helps to keep consistency, supports alignment of different management system standards, e.g. ISO9001, ISO14001, etc. With the new standard in place, organisations will find it easier to incorporate their energy management system into core business processes and get more involvement from top management.

The main change organisations who hold ISO50001:2011 will see are the requirements in clause 4.

Clause 4 relates to the context of the organisation and requires organisations to consider their relevant internal and external issues and consider the needs and expectations of interested parties who could be affected by the management system.

When establishing the scope and boundaries of certification, it is now made explicit that organisations cannot exclude any energy type at this stage.

Clause 5 relates to Leadership. The requirement for a management representative has been removed and requirements for leadership have been enhanced. This helps to ensure that energy is considered by top management and becomes a strategic issue for the organisation.

Clause 6 relates to planning. This is undertaken at a strategic and tactical level via determining actions to address risks and opportunities identified and via the undertaking of an energy review which leads to the development of objectives, action plans, Energy performance indicators (EnPI’s) and energy baselines (EnB’s) The final part of clause 6 requires us to establish a energy data collection plan.

Clause 7 relates to support and brings together the requirements to provide resources, define competencies, deliver awareness, communication and documented information as deemed necessary to ensure the EnMS is effective.

Clause 8 relates to operation, this consolidates design, procurement and operational controls relating to the facilities and equipment defined in the scope and boundaries of certification. This extends to the procurement of energy which can increasingly include a mix of energy from renewable sources.

Clause 9 relates to performance evaluation. This requires us to implement the energy data collection plan from clause 6 and undertake the actions necessary to monitor and measure, conduct internal audits and undertake management review. We recommend taking time to review and update your management review process in line with clause 9.3 of the 2018 revision.

Clause 10 relates to improvement. The term preventive action has been removed from the standard, however via determining issues (4.1) interested parties needs and expectations and legal requirements (4.2) and via taking actions to address risks and opportunities (6.1) organisations can demonstrate continual improvement in energy performance.

ISO 50001 Energy Management – Understanding the Context of The Organisation

One of the major changes in ISO 50001 is the restructuring of the standard around ISO’s high level structure. This helps to align ISO 50001 with the other mainstream standards.

However, for those organisations who only have an existing ISO 50001:2011 certification in place or if you are implementing ISO 50001:2018 for the first time then this clause may be causing some confusion. So what does context of the organisation mean..?

ISO 50001 Energy Management Context of The Organisation

The clause is broken down into 4 parts:

  • 4.1 Understanding the organization and its context
  • 4.2 Understanding the needs and expectations of interested parties
  • 4.3 Determining the scope of the energy management system
  • 4.4 Energy management system

If we work through clause 4 from start to finish we will have identified those relevant issues that are affecting us and identified the needs and expectations of our interested parties, including those that are considered legal requirements, defined the scope of certification and identified the EnMS processes and their interactions.

So commencing with 4.1. A review of annex A4 in ISO 50001 provides us with a steer to determining issues.

External Issues

Examples of external issues can include:

  • issues related to interested parties such as existing national or sector objectives, requirements or standards;
  • restrictions or limitations on energy supply, security and reliability;
  • energy costs or the availability of types of energy;
  • effects of weather;
  • effects of climate change;
  • effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Internal Issues

Examples of internal issues can include:

  • core business objectives and strategy;
  • asset management plans;
  • financial resource (labour, financial, etc.) affecting the organization;
  • energy management maturity and culture;
  • sustainability considerations;
  • contingency plans for interruptions in energy supply;
  • maturity of existing technology;
  • operational risks and liability considerations.

Determining Issues

SWOT and /or PESTLE analysis can be also considered as an effective tool for determining issues, equally a robust business plan should include consideration of issues relating to energy supply and use as part of effective business planning. Note, at this stage we only need to identify the issues, however we will return to our issues when we address clause 6.1.

A simple table can be used to capture the needs and expectations of interested parties which addresses 4.2 a), b) and c), or you may use other techniques such as stakeholder mapping or questionnaires to establish their needs. Useful online resources such as www.legislation.gov.uk can be used to identify the relevant legislation, other sources include https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-act

Once 4.1 and 4.2 have been effectively addressed, you have the information required to establish the scope and boundaries of certification, noting that in the revision of ISO 50001 no energy sources can be initially excluded from certification at this stage.

The organisation shall ensure that it has the authority to control its energy efficiency, energy use and energy consumption within the scope and boundaries. The organisation shall not exclude an energy type within the scope and boundaries.

The boundaries of certification can be considered to be the physical sites, buildings, facilities and physical assets that will be included in the management system.

The scope and boundaries need to be maintained as documented information, so consider where this will be documented within the management system.

Once the scope and boundaries are defined you can then consider the processes that will be included in the EnMS. If we consider that processes will include inputs (raw materials, energy etc) , outputs (products and services) and require resources in the form of people to support them we can map out these processes and ultimately decide whether they sit inside or outside the scope and boundaries of certification. Again, consider documenting this information to help you when undertaking energy review and when determining the relevant operational controls and monitoring and measurement requirements needed to maintain the EnMS.

ISO 50001:2018 has been published

The International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) has recently published ISO 50001:2018, the revised standard for energy management. ISO 50001:2018 has been revised to follow ISO’s common framework and High Level Structure (HLS) used for management system standards. This change will make it easier to integrate with other management system certifications, such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. Those that are already certified to the 2011 version of the standard will have 3 years to transition to the 2018 version.

What is the difference between the 2011 and 2018 standards?

ISO 50001:2018 is based on Annex SL – the new ISO high level structure (HLS) that brings a common framework to all management systems, i.e. it applies a common language across all standards.

This helps to keep consistency, supports alignment of different management system standards, e.g. ISO9001, ISO14001, etc. With the new standard in place, organisations will find it easier to incorporate their energy management system into core business processes and get more involvement from top management.

Other changes include:-

  • New clause for understanding the organization and its context (4.1)
  • New clause for systematic determination of the needs and expectations of interested parties (4.2)
  • Strengthened emphasis on leadership and top management commitment
  • Addition of Risk and opportunity management
  • Addition of Competence (7.2)
  • Extended requirements related to communications (7.4)
  • Additions to Operational planning and control (8.1)
  • Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation of energy performance and the EnMS (9.1)
  • Additions to Management review (9.3)

How your company can benefit from adopting ISO 50001

If energy use is one of your organisations significant environmental aspects, then an Energy management system (EnMS) may provide additional benefit and enhanced focus on energy management.

Application of ISO50001 contributes to more efficient use of available energy sources, to enhanced competitiveness and to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other related environmental impacts. ISO50001 is applicable irrespective of the types of energy used, e.g. electricity, gas, diesel, petrol etc…

Follow our Twitter and LinkedIn for more updates about the revised ISO 50001:2018

What is ISO 50001:2018?

The ISO 50001 energy management standard specifies requirements for an organisation to establish, implement, maintain and improve an Energy Management System (EnMS), enabling the organisation to take a systematic approach to achieving continual improvement of energy performance.

ISO 50001 is an ideal tool for helping your organisation to establish the systems and processes necessary for achieving improved energy efficiency, financial savings and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, through systematic management of energy.

This webinar was held on the 8th October 2018 and covers the following:-

  • What is ISO 50001:2018?
  • What’s the difference between the 2011 and 2018 standards?
  • What are the benefits of ISO 50001:2018?
  • How Blackmores can help you to achieve ISO 50001 certification

Do you need assistance with ISO 50001? We’d be happy to help, simply contact us on: enquiries@blackmoresuk.com 

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