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The updated ISO 27001:2022 has had several changes, including the addition of 11 completely new controls and the merging of 56 other controls into 24 newly titled controls.  

These changes mean that anyone with a current ISO 27001:2013 certificate will be required to update and add certain elements in their existing Information Security Management System to ensure compliance to ISO 27001:2022 ahead of the October 2025 deadline.

Join Mel this week as she explains the changes that need to be made, including what key documentation requires updating to align with ISO 27001:2022.

You’ll learn

  • What changes need to be made to your existing Information Security Management System?
  • What key documents need to be updated?
  • How can you get a free copy of ISO 27001:2022?

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[00:44] In the last episode we covered the planning stages for your transition – catch up here

[01:02] We have a free ‘Guide to the ISO 27001 Changes’ available – simply fill out the form at the end of the Show Notes to download your copy

[01:29] You should have a copy of ISO 27001:2022 ahead of Implementing the changes (you can get a free copy if you sign up to our Transition Programme by April 1st 2023)

[01:35] Before you move onto Implementation, ensure that you have: planned back from your transition date, have an understanding of the new controls and had a Discovery session / Gap Analysis to see where the gaps in your current system are

[02:11] This is also a good opportunity to revamp your Management System! We have a few older episodes to help you with this: #102, #103, #104

[02:50] What needs updating? This will include:

  • Your Statement of Applicability
  • Risk Assessment
  • Objectives
  • Action Plans
  • Monitoring and measurement (reviewing what you are monitoring / measuring and how it’s recorded)
  • Internal Audit Schedule / Programme – To include the new controls

[03:45] At this stage you need to look at what controls you have in place – there may be some you can now merge together to reduce any paperwork involved.

[04:25] We have some tools available to tackle the new controls (i.e Threat Intelligence, data masking, physical security monitoring ect) if you need some extra help

[04:50] It’s not just about updating documentation, you will need to fully implement and communication these new controls to the wider business. You may find that you already have some controls covered, but not yet formalised.

[05:30] The main aspect of the Implementation phase is to address the gaps found during the Gap Analysis. For example, new controls such as data masking, threat intelligence and web filtering, which you may not have considered seriously before, now need to put formal documented measures in place to address it.

[06:26] Communication and evidence should be at the forefront of your mind when updating your Info Sec Management System.

[06:39] Don’t just implement controls for the sake of it – considering how they are going to reduce risk and how they’re going to make a difference to improve your Risk Register and Statement of Applicability.

[07:00] The Implementation phase of our Transition Programme is 1-3 days depending on your level of required support

[07:54] You should also consider creating a Communication Plan to share knowledge of these changes to the wider business. Make sure you also compile any evidence of training on new elements of your Management System too. We will have Coffee Break Training available on the isologyhub which could help with this.  

Grab a copy of our ISO 27001:2022 Guideline to the changes here:

Keep an eye out for next weeks episode where we explain how to complete your ISO 27001:2022 transition.

We’d love to hear your views and comments about the ISO Show, here’s how:

  • Share the ISO Show on Twitter or Linkedin
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes or Soundcloud. Your ratings and reviews really help and we read each one.

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ISO 27001 2022 is here, which means it’s time to start thinking about starting the transition process. While the deadline is set at December 2025, it’s never too early to start!

If this is all news to you, check out our previous three episodes, where we reviewed all the major changes to ISO 27001, including clause updates and the 11 completely new controls added.

Join Mel this week as she explains what you need to know before embarking on your ISO 27001 transition journey, in addition to a summary of our transition programme.

You’ll learn

  • How to plan for your ISO 27001 transition
  • How can Blackmores help you?
  • How can you get a free copy of ISO 27001:2022?

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[00:44] Businesses have until October 2025 to transition to the updated version of ISO 27001:2022 – but don’t wait until the last minute! Certification Bodies get really booked up in the last year, and you could risk losing your certification and paying for another Stage 1 and 2 Assessment.  

 [01:30] We recommend that you start thinking about your transition in 2023 so you have everything in place to start the process in 2024.  

[02:28] As a recap – the major changes to ISO 27001:2022 are: 56 controls have been merged into 24 newly titled controls, the addition of 11 completely new controls and controls are now categorised into just 4 groups instead of the 14 from the previous version.

[03:00] ISO 27001:2022 Guide to the changes available – Simply fill out the form available at the end of the show notes to grab a copy!

[04:25] Over the next few episodes, Mel will talk through the process of planning, implementing and preparation for the Certification Body transition visit.

[05:51] All steps of the transition process are laid out in our Transition Programme, which includes: an awareness video, a transition action plan, Implementation of changes, Internal auditing of the changes and some optional support during the Certification Body visit.  

[08:45] The Planning Phase: We recommend trying to combine your transition visit with your next Surveillance visit – you can have a chat with your CB to see if that’s possible. This may not be possible if your Surveillance is coming up very soon, as you need time to implement the changes needed. Those that have it in say 6 or more months’ time would be in a good position to make the request.   

[09:30] Certification Bodies are recommending an extra half day for transition –  some may require a desktop review ahead of the actual visit. Combining this visit with your Surveillance is a good way to reduce costs.

[10:30] When planning out your timescales for transition, don’t forget to inform Leadership and key personnel involved in the running of the Management System about the expected changes to come – and plan in time for them to help with the implementation.

[11:10] Understanding the changes: We gave a high-level overview of the 11 new controls in our last episode. We will also have 11 Coffee Break Training courses covering the controls in more detail, available from March 31st 2023 on the isologyhub.

[12:11] Offer: We’re including a free copy of ISO 27001:2022 for those that sign up to our Transition Programme before April 1st 2023.

[12:34] You may get asked for a copy of the Standard at your transition visit – as having a copy can come under ‘other’ legal requirements.  

[13:10] Discovery Phase: We have a transition checklist which can help you identify where the gaps are in terms of compliance with the new controls. You may already have some of it in place!

Grab a copy of our ISO 27001:2022 Guide to the changes here:

Keep an eye out for next weeks episode where we dive into how to Implement the changes…

We’d love to hear your views and comments about the ISO Show, here’s how:

  • Share the ISO Show on Twitter or Linkedin
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes or Soundcloud. Your ratings and reviews really help and we read each one.

Subscribe to keep up-to-date with our latest episodes:

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ISO 27001, The Information Security Standard, was updated in October 2022. While there is a 2-year grace period for transition, we would urge everyone to make a start on implementing the changes to ensure you are compliant with latest best practice standards.

Over the last two episodes, we’ve gone over the key changes and explored the specific clause updates in more detail. As mentioned in the first episode of this mini-series, there have been 11 new controls added to ISO 27001:2022.

Mel is once again joined by Steve Mason, Managing Consultant here at Blackmores, to discuss the 11 new controls added to ISO 27001:2022 and their purpose.  

You’ll learn

  • What are the 11 new controls in ISO 27001:2022?
  • Why have these been added?
  • What is their purpose?

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[01:00] A quick overview of the key changes –  56 Controls combined into 24 newly titled controls, 11 new controls added and 58 existing controls remained unchanged.

 [02:30] We have been over a few of the new controls in ISO 27002:2022 in more detail in a few previous episodes: #111, #112, #113, #114

[02:50] These new controls are nothing to worry about – they are simply aligning the Standard with more modern security considerations. You may already be complying with them!

[03:32] Control A.5.7 Threat intelligence‘To provide awareness of the organization’s threat environment so that the appropriate mitigation actions can be taken.’ This can come from many different sources, such as the NCSC or local police websites. There are also additional tools you can add to detect possible phishing attacks. This also includes consideration to external threats – Information Security is about much more than just protecting data! It also includes physical security.

[05:33] Control A.5.23 Information security for use of cloud services “To specify and manage information security for the use of cloud services.” – More and more businesses reply on cloud-based computing. It’s important to verify the security of your service provider to ensure it’s adequate. You can check to see if they have any valid Information Security related credentials such as CSA Star, Cyber Essentials, SOC. You could also adopt principles of ISO 27017 (certification for cloud security), ISO 27018 (Protection of PII in the public cloud) and ISO 27701 (PII security Standard).

[08:30] Control A.5.30 ICT readiness for business continuity –‘ To ensure the availability of the organization’s information and other associated assets during disruption’ – There a few standards that could assist with this, including ISO 27031 (ICT readiness for Business Continuity). Those that have ISO 22301 may want to look at how ISO 27001 elements can be integrated and improved in any disaster recovery plans. ISO 27001 needs to be an integral part of any business continuity plans – not just a bolt on. Small business may not want to conduct a full business impact analysis, but should carry out a risk assessment around business continuity at the very least.

[11:30] Control A.5.30 ICT readiness for business continuity – further considerations: A key focus of this part of the Standard is Recovery Time Objectives and Recovery Point Objectives. Overall, the whole business continuity aspect of the updated ISO 27001:2022 may take a bit of work to implement, but you will ultimately be much better off in the event of a disaster or security incident. For further guidance, you may want to check out an older non-certifiable standard, BS 25777 (ICT continuity).

[13:20] Control A.7.4 Physical security monitoring To detect and deter unauthorized physical access.’ This can include things like CCTV, access control, swipe cards ect. This also includes the ability and regular practice of monitoring these access methods, for the purpose of detecting any anomalies.

[18:56] Control A.8.9 Configuration management‘To ensure hardware, software, services and networks function correctly with required security settings, and configuration is not altered by unauthorized or incorrect changes’ – Configuration for things like a firewall, software, any hardware devices, passwords ect should be documented, explained and monitored on a regular basis to ensure nothing has been changed without notifying the relevant people. ISO 20000 includes a helpful section around configuration if you require further guidance.  

[21:41] Control A.8.10 Information deletion‘To prevent unnecessary exposure of sensitive information and to comply with legal, statutory, regulatory and contractual requirements for information deletion.’ – This already existed in the Standard, it has simply been clarified further. You will now need to prove that data has been deleted as required, if you use a 3rd party for this, they will need to provide the relevant certificates.  

[22:05] Control A.8.11 Data Masking‘To limit the exposure of sensitive data including PII, and to comply with legal, statutory, regulatory and contractual requirements.’ – You have 3 options for data masking: Obfuscation, pseudonymisation and annoymisation. This also helps to comply with GDPR requirements.

[24:10] Control A.8.12 Data leakage prevention‘To detect and prevent the unauthorized disclosure and extraction of information by individuals or systems.’ – This control has made a return from the 2005 version of ISO 27001. Businesses should have systems in place to monitor any particularly large data downloads – or even possibly large print batches. You should also ensure that you have a secure email system in place as well as VPN’s and regular security training to sure up your security to prevent any potential leaks.

[27:00] Control A.8.16 Monitoring Activities  – ‘To detect anomalous behaviour and potential information security incidents.– Appropriate monitoring should be in place to detect any potentially dangerous or malicious behavior.  

[28:00] Control A.8.23 Web Filtering  – ‘To protect systems from being compromised by malware and to prevent access to unauthorized web resources.’ – Your systems should be set up in a way to prevent people from accessing unsecure or unsavory sites. This could include Social Media sites – but be mindful that there may have to be exceptions for marketing or communications personnel for those particular sites.

[28:00] Control A.8.28 Secure Coding‘To ensure software is written securely thereby reducing the number of potential information security vulnerabilities in the software.’ – If you have created your own secure coding, be sure to evaluate it against industry professional standards such as OWASP and NIST.  

As a reminder, we’ll be running a mini-series through January and February on the updated ISO 27001:2022 in addition to how you can transition to the new version.

Keep an eye out for next weeks episode where we dive into the clause clarifications and control changes of ISO 27001:2022…

We’d love to hear your views and comments about the ISO Show, here’s how:

  • Share the ISO Show on Twitter or Linkedin
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes or Soundcloud. Your ratings and reviews really help and we read each one.

Subscribe to keep up-to-date with our latest episodes:

Stitcher | Spotify | YouTube | iTunes | Soundcloud

As many of you are aware, an updated version of ISO 27001 was published in October 2022. While there is a 2-year grace period for transition, we would urge everyone to make a start on implementing the changes to ensure you are compliant with latest best practice standards. But where do you start?

In the last episode, Mel and Steve gave an overview of the updated ISO 27001:2022, including a high-level look at some of the key changes.

In addition to the control changes, there have been several changes made to specific clauses within the Standard.

Mel is once again joined by Steve Mason, Managing Consultant here at Blackmores, to discuss the ISO 27001:2022 clause updates and their purpose.

You’ll learn

  • What clauses have been updated from the 2013 version of ISO 27001?
  • Why have these clauses been updated?

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[01:06] The changes to these clauses appear to align your Management System with the business more so than in the previous iteration of ISO 27001 – a key focus is integration.

 [01:20] First change: Clause 4.2 Understanding the needs and expectations of Interested parties‘c) which of these requirements will be addressed through the information security management system.’ This seeks to align the Management System with interested parties and identify where it may or may not be able to meet their needs and expectations.

[03:30] Clause 4.4 Information Security Management System‘The organization shall establish, implement, maintain and continually improve an information security management system, including the processes needed and their interactions, in accordance with the requirements of this document.’ There will be more focus on process flows and not Policies and Procedures. This can be further used to align the Management System with your business, by clearly identifying where it fits in with your business activities. 

[06:14] Clause 5.1. Leadership ‘Reference to “business” in this document can be interpreted broadly to mean those activities that are core to the purposes of the organization’s existence.’ – This acts more as a reminder to top management to ensure they include the Management System as part of the business and not just a bolt-on. It should be a part of the strategy and part of the business (part of the ship, part of the crew)

[07:42] Clause 6.1.3  Information Security Risk Treatment ‘ Note 2 in sub-clause ‘c’ now states ‘Annex A contains a list of possible information security controls.’ (it had previously read Annex A contains a comprehensive list of control objectives and controls.) – This simply means that you can add references to other controls outside of the list provided within Annex A i.e. NIST or Cyber Essentials. Though, do be careful to avoid doing this at minutia level, as that just increases Management System maintenance.

[09:15] Clause 6.2  Information security objectives and planning to achieve them‘ A couple of extra points have been added to this clause: d) be monitored g) be available as documented information’  – The monitoring was previously a given, but not really specified. So now, you’ll have to demonstrate how you’re monitoring objective planning and achievements.

[10:24] Clause 6.3 Planning of Changes‘When the organization determines the need for changes to the information security management system, the changes shall be carried out in a planned manner.’ – This has now been aligned more with ISO 9001’s approach to changes. All changes should be planned before implementation, and this now includes information security consideration. Fun fact – they forgot to include this clause in the Standard table of contents! (as of January 2023, this will probably be added later!)

[11:55] Clause 9.3.2  Management Review Inputs‘ c) changes in needs and expectations of interested parties that are relevant to the information security management system’ – This just ensures that the needs and expectations of your Interested Parties are reviewed and not just left stagnant.

[13:20] To help you revamp your Management Review, check out episodes #99 and #100

As a reminder, we’ll be running a mini-series through January and February on the updated ISO 27001:2022 in addition to how you can transition to the new version.

Keep an eye out for next weeks episode where we dive into the clause clarifications and control changes of ISO 27001:2022…

We’d love to hear your views and comments about the ISO Show, here’s how:

  • Share the ISO Show on Twitter or Linkedin
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes or Soundcloud. Your ratings and reviews really help and we read each one.

Subscribe to keep up-to-date with our latest episodes:

Stitcher | Spotify | YouTube | iTunes | Soundcloud

The long-awaited update of ISO 27001 arrived in October 2022, having gone 9 years since its previous 2013 iteration. Needless to say, it was much overdue.

The new 2022 version of the Standard includes 11 new controls and sees around 56 other controls combined into 24 newly titled controls.

In order to cover every aspect of the new Standard, we’ll be running a mini-series through January and February on the updated ISO 27001:2022 in addition to how you can transition to the new version.

Starting off the series strong, Mel is joined once again by Steve Mason, our very own Information Security guru, to broadly discuss the changes to ISO 27001:2022.

You’ll learn

  • Who is ISO 27001:2022 applicable to?
  • An overview of the changes to ISO 27001:2022
  • What is Steve’s favorite change to ISO 27001:2022?
  • What are the challenges involved with updating to the 2022 version?

Resources

In this episode, we talk about:

[01:50] Steve Gives an overview of what’s new in ISO 27001:2022 – The updated version of ISO 27001 was released on the 26th Oct 2022. The new version included 24 changes and clarifications within the main clauses.

 [02:50] The controls for the new standard are now categorised into 4 groups: Organisation, People, Physical and Technology  

[05:50] We covered some of the new controls in more detail in previous episodes: #109, #110, #111, #112, #113 and #114

[06:17] The 24 changes and clarifications to Clauses include older existing clauses which have been tidied up to be more transparent. We recommend reviewing to ensure that you are complying in a way that aligns with the Standard.

[06:35] There are 11 new Controls. 56 controls from the 2013 version have been reduced to 24 with 58 remaining unchanged. So, in short, Annex A has been simplified with less duplication of controls.

[07:44] Steve highlights section A.9 for Access Control as one of the much-improved controls – due to the lack of repetition and simplified requirements for compliance.

[08:35] Steve’s favourite update to the Standard: The whole Standard now collectively encourages incorporation into your business. Your ISMS should not feel like a bolt on, it should be a part of your businesses DNA.

[10:36] Steve’s favourite update to the Standard #2: It’s not a static Standard, it encourages development and continual improvement.  

[13:45] For those completely new to ISO 27001 – check out our 3-part Steps to Success series which explains the Implementation process from start to finish.

[14:38] Listen to some of our client interviews to hear the challenges others faced when Implementing ISO 27001 in addition to the benefits gained as a result of adopting the Standard:   

[14:50] Why would the business continuity elements of ISO 27001:2022 pose a challenge?  There used to be a clause in the 2005 version of the standard which documented the need for a business impact analysis – this was removed in the 2013 version. The new ‘ICT readiness for business continuity’ control will require at the very least, a risk assessment.   

[16:48] Steve recommends checking out the Plan, Do, Act, Check diagram in ISO 27031 (Guidelines for information and communication technology readiness for business continuity). It also includes some great guidance on business impact analysis.

[18:40] The ICT readiness control is not designed to be an all encompassing business continuity strategy – it’s designed to work in tandem with as existing one (you may already be certified to ISO 22301 Business Continuity Management).

 [19:50] It’s highly recommended that if you don’t have a Business Continuity Plan or strategy – at least have a framework in place. Disasters by their nature are unpredictable, as is the resulting damage to an extent. You will not know the full extent until you’ve lived it – so don’t write an exhaustive 80+ page manual that no-one will read, document the what, who and how of getting yourself back up and running again.

[21:11] There has also been an update to ISO 27005 (Risk assessment in relation to info sec). It includes a new set of threat categories: physical threats, natural threats, infrastructure failures, technical failures, human actions, compromised services or functions and organisational threats. These may help you when putting a business continuity framework in place.

[22:05] Above all else – ISO 27001:2022 has modernised and aligned itself more with the likes of cyber essentials and NIST.

Keep an eye out for next weeks episode where we dive into the clause updates…

We’d love to hear your views and comments about the ISO Show, here’s how:

  • Share the ISO Show on Twitter or Linkedin
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes or Soundcloud. Your ratings and reviews really help and we read each one.

Subscribe to keep up-to-date with our latest episodes:

Stitcher | Spotify | YouTube | iTunes | Soundcloud

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